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Jun 5
Moonrise Kingdom Review
Moonrise Kingdom is Wes Anderson’s newest cinematic release that follows a series of events in 1965 on an isolated island called Penzance. Inhabiting this island, among Anderson’s quirk and whimsy, are two precocious teenagers who determine, through a series of correspondences, that they are soul mates. There are of course obstacles!  Sam (Jared Gilman) is a misunderstood orphan in his third year at scouting camp, led by the hilarious Scout Master Ward (Edward Norton). Suzy (Kara Hayward) is a troubled teen raised by two lawyers  (Bill Murray, Frances McDormand), who are too engrossed in their own transgressions to give her the attention that a teenager needs. Suzy and Sam’s common bond of teenage angst drives them to run away in one of the most elaborate schemes in movie history! Leading the search for Suzy and Sam is Captain Sharp. Besides the fact that he is a police officer devoted to his work, he is a rather pathetic man. From Suzy and Sam’s departure, the magic unfolds.
Wes Anderson’s marvelous command of cinematic art is best exhibited by how well all the elements cooperate. Every Anderson film is a compelling blueprint that integrates tone, language, style, and direction. The visual offerings of each frame are meaningful. Every single costume piece, from high-rise pants to knitted clothing pieces, serves a purpose.  Such meticulous detailing can create a multitude of implications, making the content to take in at once; however, there is enough story development to engage the viewer. Make no mistake - despite Moonrise Kingdom’s subtleties, this is one of Anderson’s boldest offerings.
Each actor in Moonrise Kingdom gives a convincing performance. While Suzy and Sam are passionate characters, the adults display opposite attitudes. The emotional differences between the age groups highlight an apathy about adulthood. Somewhere between childhood and adulthood, one can lose a sense of awe, spontaneity, vigor for new emotions, and determination to change his/her life. The emotional honesty of Moonrise Kingdom is not only artful - it is realistic. We can relate to the feelings, and therefore, the characters. To capture the spectrum of sentiments universal among humans, that is a true art.
The only thing I love more than fresh sushi is a good movie. The only thing I love more than a good movie  is a Wes Anderson movie. If you haven’t seen a Wes Anderson movie before, I suggest you see one . His cinematic voice is sonorous and technically flawless. Anderson’s movies are a peek  into his world of quaint, quirky, and calculated genius. From Rushmore to The Darjeeling Limited, Anderson’s art is art for art’s sake. No product placement, no  filler, no casting celebrities just because they are beautiful. Just. Raw. Organic. Material.  This, ladies and gentlemen, is how films should be made. See this movie.
Written by Ron

Moonrise Kingdom Review

Moonrise Kingdom is Wes Anderson’s newest cinematic release that follows a series of events in 1965 on an isolated island called Penzance. Inhabiting this island, among Anderson’s quirk and whimsy, are two precocious teenagers who determine, through a series of correspondences, that they are soul mates. There are of course obstacles!  Sam (Jared Gilman) is a misunderstood orphan in his third year at scouting camp, led by the hilarious Scout Master Ward (Edward Norton). Suzy (Kara Hayward) is a troubled teen raised by two lawyers  (Bill Murray, Frances McDormand), who are too engrossed in their own transgressions to give her the attention that a teenager needs. Suzy and Sam’s common bond of teenage angst drives them to run away in one of the most elaborate schemes in movie history! Leading the search for Suzy and Sam is Captain Sharp. Besides the fact that he is a police officer devoted to his work, he is a rather pathetic man. From Suzy and Sam’s departure, the magic unfolds.

Wes Anderson’s marvelous command of cinematic art is best exhibited by how well all the elements cooperate. Every Anderson film is a compelling blueprint that integrates tone, language, style, and direction. The visual offerings of each frame are meaningful. Every single costume piece, from high-rise pants to knitted clothing pieces, serves a purpose.  Such meticulous detailing can create a multitude of implications, making the content to take in at once; however, there is enough story development to engage the viewer. Make no mistake - despite Moonrise Kingdom’s subtleties, this is one of Anderson’s boldest offerings.

Each actor in Moonrise Kingdom gives a convincing performance. While Suzy and Sam are passionate characters, the adults display opposite attitudes. The emotional differences between the age groups highlight an apathy about adulthood. Somewhere between childhood and adulthood, one can lose a sense of awe, spontaneity, vigor for new emotions, and determination to change his/her life. The emotional honesty of Moonrise Kingdom is not only artful - it is realistic. We can relate to the feelings, and therefore, the characters. To capture the spectrum of sentiments universal among humans, that is a true art.

The only thing I love more than fresh sushi is a good movie. The only thing I love more than a good movie  is a Wes Anderson movie. If you haven’t seen a Wes Anderson movie before, I suggest you see one . His cinematic voice is sonorous and technically flawless. Anderson’s movies are a peek  into his world of quaint, quirky, and calculated genius. From Rushmore to The Darjeeling Limited, Anderson’s art is art for art’s sake. No product placement, no  filler, no casting celebrities just because they are beautiful. Just. Raw. Organic. Material.  This, ladies and gentlemen, is how films should be made. See this movie.

Written by Ron