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Posts tagged with "review"

Jun 5
Moonrise Kingdom Review
Moonrise Kingdom is Wes Anderson’s newest cinematic release that follows a series of events in 1965 on an isolated island called Penzance. Inhabiting this island, among Anderson’s quirk and whimsy, are two precocious teenagers who determine, through a series of correspondences, that they are soul mates. There are of course obstacles!  Sam (Jared Gilman) is a misunderstood orphan in his third year at scouting camp, led by the hilarious Scout Master Ward (Edward Norton). Suzy (Kara Hayward) is a troubled teen raised by two lawyers  (Bill Murray, Frances McDormand), who are too engrossed in their own transgressions to give her the attention that a teenager needs. Suzy and Sam’s common bond of teenage angst drives them to run away in one of the most elaborate schemes in movie history! Leading the search for Suzy and Sam is Captain Sharp. Besides the fact that he is a police officer devoted to his work, he is a rather pathetic man. From Suzy and Sam’s departure, the magic unfolds.
Wes Anderson’s marvelous command of cinematic art is best exhibited by how well all the elements cooperate. Every Anderson film is a compelling blueprint that integrates tone, language, style, and direction. The visual offerings of each frame are meaningful. Every single costume piece, from high-rise pants to knitted clothing pieces, serves a purpose.  Such meticulous detailing can create a multitude of implications, making the content to take in at once; however, there is enough story development to engage the viewer. Make no mistake - despite Moonrise Kingdom’s subtleties, this is one of Anderson’s boldest offerings.
Each actor in Moonrise Kingdom gives a convincing performance. While Suzy and Sam are passionate characters, the adults display opposite attitudes. The emotional differences between the age groups highlight an apathy about adulthood. Somewhere between childhood and adulthood, one can lose a sense of awe, spontaneity, vigor for new emotions, and determination to change his/her life. The emotional honesty of Moonrise Kingdom is not only artful - it is realistic. We can relate to the feelings, and therefore, the characters. To capture the spectrum of sentiments universal among humans, that is a true art.
The only thing I love more than fresh sushi is a good movie. The only thing I love more than a good movie  is a Wes Anderson movie. If you haven’t seen a Wes Anderson movie before, I suggest you see one . His cinematic voice is sonorous and technically flawless. Anderson’s movies are a peek  into his world of quaint, quirky, and calculated genius. From Rushmore to The Darjeeling Limited, Anderson’s art is art for art’s sake. No product placement, no  filler, no casting celebrities just because they are beautiful. Just. Raw. Organic. Material.  This, ladies and gentlemen, is how films should be made. See this movie.
Written by Ron

Moonrise Kingdom Review

Moonrise Kingdom is Wes Anderson’s newest cinematic release that follows a series of events in 1965 on an isolated island called Penzance. Inhabiting this island, among Anderson’s quirk and whimsy, are two precocious teenagers who determine, through a series of correspondences, that they are soul mates. There are of course obstacles!  Sam (Jared Gilman) is a misunderstood orphan in his third year at scouting camp, led by the hilarious Scout Master Ward (Edward Norton). Suzy (Kara Hayward) is a troubled teen raised by two lawyers  (Bill Murray, Frances McDormand), who are too engrossed in their own transgressions to give her the attention that a teenager needs. Suzy and Sam’s common bond of teenage angst drives them to run away in one of the most elaborate schemes in movie history! Leading the search for Suzy and Sam is Captain Sharp. Besides the fact that he is a police officer devoted to his work, he is a rather pathetic man. From Suzy and Sam’s departure, the magic unfolds.

Wes Anderson’s marvelous command of cinematic art is best exhibited by how well all the elements cooperate. Every Anderson film is a compelling blueprint that integrates tone, language, style, and direction. The visual offerings of each frame are meaningful. Every single costume piece, from high-rise pants to knitted clothing pieces, serves a purpose.  Such meticulous detailing can create a multitude of implications, making the content to take in at once; however, there is enough story development to engage the viewer. Make no mistake - despite Moonrise Kingdom’s subtleties, this is one of Anderson’s boldest offerings.

Each actor in Moonrise Kingdom gives a convincing performance. While Suzy and Sam are passionate characters, the adults display opposite attitudes. The emotional differences between the age groups highlight an apathy about adulthood. Somewhere between childhood and adulthood, one can lose a sense of awe, spontaneity, vigor for new emotions, and determination to change his/her life. The emotional honesty of Moonrise Kingdom is not only artful - it is realistic. We can relate to the feelings, and therefore, the characters. To capture the spectrum of sentiments universal among humans, that is a true art.

The only thing I love more than fresh sushi is a good movie. The only thing I love more than a good movie  is a Wes Anderson movie. If you haven’t seen a Wes Anderson movie before, I suggest you see one . His cinematic voice is sonorous and technically flawless. Anderson’s movies are a peek  into his world of quaint, quirky, and calculated genius. From Rushmore to The Darjeeling Limited, Anderson’s art is art for art’s sake. No product placement, no  filler, no casting celebrities just because they are beautiful. Just. Raw. Organic. Material.  This, ladies and gentlemen, is how films should be made. See this movie.

Written by Ron

Apr 1
The Briefly Brief Review of The Hunger Games ( … for those that have and haven’t read the book)Written by: Ronald James 
(Warning: This review does not include a synopsis of the story itself! If you don’t know what it’s about by now, Wiki it.)
The Hunger Games is a movie that has been riddled with hype and controversy. It grossed over 150 million dollars in its opening week and its momentum does not seem to be slowing up. The novel, sharing the same title and authored by novelist and TV writer Suzanne Collins, is doing tremendously well. It’s clear that from the success of this movie, the other two books in the trilogy are in the pipeline. The fact of the matter is, the hype machine (well placed ads, and an amazing online presence) can manufacture success for even the most mediocre of movies. So … is The Hunger Games good? I will attempt to dissect that that question as briefly as I can.
When a movie has source material, people that have indulged in the literary counterpart often ask a very adversarial question: “Have you read the book?” When you reply hesitantly with a “No,” judgement and the “… then you could never possibly understand” expression befalls them. You are not a pariah if you haven’t read the source material! I have a wholehearted belief that a movie translation of a book should not be a literal translation of every passage. The Hunger Games is written in a first-person perspective, and therefore by nature lacks a lot of the omniscience found in stories written in third person. Due to this fact, this perspective is often replaced with a sort of “this person is probably pissed off right now” sort of reflection of the unknown. There is no one way to tell how some things are going outside of the actual Hunger Games outside of this sort of guessing by Katniss Everdeen. This first-person perspective also grants the reader a chance to know the motive behind the mental conflicts that often exist for a person in general. I happen to think that this is impossible to replicate in film form. When people say “The movie is not as good as book,” maybe they are right in some ways.  A director’s vision for the source material will never match your imagination. Ever. In short, get the fuck over it!
There are things that have been changed in the movie vs. the book…some of which I will list below:
The Gamemakers who orchestrate The Hunger Games in the book have a single leader named the “Gamemaker” in the movie (he didn’t exist in the book).
There is a de-facto leader of the Capitol, President Snow (he doesn’t exist in the book).
The liberties taken are means to personify an element of the book that was not given much page time in order to focus on the story itself. I’ll accept it. There are several other things that are significantly different and I am willing to accept most of them. Some of them, however, will make you cringe if you have read the book. Ah Well. 
So … what about the movie as a movie (and not just a book)? The tone of the entire movie is dark, which I believe it should be when 12-18 year-olds are fighting to the death in an arena. Every death is done in the sort of optical illusion exercised in the shower scene in the movie Scarface. You think you saw someone get their head cut open by a chainsaw, but if you slow it down and truly pay attention, it was just good camera work. The Hunger Games pushes the limit of what a PG-13 movie can do. Other directors take notice!!! The movie was well casted, and no one quite feels out of place. The movie is color porn and accurately depicts each setting quite accurately, and the costumes are very fitting of the movie’s settings.
This movie isn’t without its problems. Backstory is poorly explained and random flashbacks only provide clarity for people who have read the source material. Living in the poorest District in the world of Panem doesn’t mean that you are the curviest woman in the entire movie. Jennifer Lawrence ‘s portrayal of a conflicted, amazingly strong woman comes across rather flat at times. There is a depth to the character that I think that the script didn’t allow her to express. Maybe not her fault. The movie at times feels like a documentary with the shaky cam technique that is exercised can be nauseating. The ending of the movie is horrific. The third act is very good with the last 2 minutes of the movie utterly confusing you. 
With all of these things said, it was one of the best movies of this sort that I have seen in a while. It has all the heart, soul, and grit to be just as successful as the Harry Potter franchise. A story that involves oppression and mistreatment delivered in a way that is understandable and watchable is a hard task, and this delivers. The characters are likable, the action is unrelenting when it occurs, and you believe that Katniss Everdeen can conquer the world. The source material is strong and I think that this is a good representation of it. I can’t wait to see what will happen with the next two movies. I highly recommend this movie.
DIRECTOR: Gary Ross
SCREENWRITER: Gary Ross, Suzanne Collins, Billy Ray 
CAST: Jennifer Lawrence, Josh Hutcherson, Liam Hemsworth, Elizabeth Banks, Woody Harrelson, Donald Sutherland, Lenny Kravitz, Stanley Tucci, 
RELEASE DATE: OUT NOW
MPAA RATING: PG-13

The Briefly Brief Review of The Hunger Games ( … for those that have and haven’t read the book)
Written by: Ronald James 

(Warning: This review does not include a synopsis of the story itself! If you don’t know what it’s about by now, Wiki it.)

The Hunger Games is a movie that has been riddled with hype and controversy. It grossed over 150 million dollars in its opening week and its momentum does not seem to be slowing up. The novel, sharing the same title and authored by novelist and TV writer Suzanne Collins, is doing tremendously well. It’s clear that from the success of this movie, the other two books in the trilogy are in the pipeline. The fact of the matter is, the hype machine (well placed ads, and an amazing online presence) can manufacture success for even the most mediocre of movies. So … is The Hunger Games good? I will attempt to dissect that that question as briefly as I can.

When a movie has source material, people that have indulged in the literary counterpart often ask a very adversarial question: “Have you read the book?” When you reply hesitantly with a “No,” judgement and the “… then you could never possibly understand” expression befalls them. You are not a pariah if you haven’t read the source material! I have a wholehearted belief that a movie translation of a book should not be a literal translation of every passage. The Hunger Games is written in a first-person perspective, and therefore by nature lacks a lot of the omniscience found in stories written in third person. Due to this fact, this perspective is often replaced with a sort of “this person is probably pissed off right now” sort of reflection of the unknown. There is no one way to tell how some things are going outside of the actual Hunger Games outside of this sort of guessing by Katniss Everdeen. This first-person perspective also grants the reader a chance to know the motive behind the mental conflicts that often exist for a person in general. I happen to think that this is impossible to replicate in film form. When people say “The movie is not as good as book,” maybe they are right in some ways.  A director’s vision for the source material will never match your imagination. Ever. In short, get the fuck over it!

There are things that have been changed in the movie vs. the book…some of which I will list below:

The Gamemakers who orchestrate The Hunger Games in the book have a single leader named the “Gamemaker” in the movie (he didn’t exist in the book).

There is a de-facto leader of the Capitol, President Snow (he doesn’t exist in the book).

The liberties taken are means to personify an element of the book that was not given much page time in order to focus on the story itself. I’ll accept it. There are several other things that are significantly different and I am willing to accept most of them. Some of them, however, will make you cringe if you have read the book. Ah Well. 

So … what about the movie as a movie (and not just a book)? The tone of the entire movie is dark, which I believe it should be when 12-18 year-olds are fighting to the death in an arena. Every death is done in the sort of optical illusion exercised in the shower scene in the movie Scarface. You think you saw someone get their head cut open by a chainsaw, but if you slow it down and truly pay attention, it was just good camera work. The Hunger Games pushes the limit of what a PG-13 movie can do. Other directors take notice!!! The movie was well casted, and no one quite feels out of place. The movie is color porn and accurately depicts each setting quite accurately, and the costumes are very fitting of the movie’s settings.

This movie isn’t without its problems. Backstory is poorly explained and random flashbacks only provide clarity for people who have read the source material. Living in the poorest District in the world of Panem doesn’t mean that you are the curviest woman in the entire movie. Jennifer Lawrence ‘s portrayal of a conflicted, amazingly strong woman comes across rather flat at times. There is a depth to the character that I think that the script didn’t allow her to express. Maybe not her fault. The movie at times feels like a documentary with the shaky cam technique that is exercised can be nauseating. The ending of the movie is horrific. The third act is very good with the last 2 minutes of the movie utterly confusing you. 

With all of these things said, it was one of the best movies of this sort that I have seen in a while. It has all the heart, soul, and grit to be just as successful as the Harry Potter franchise. A story that involves oppression and mistreatment delivered in a way that is understandable and watchable is a hard task, and this delivers. The characters are likable, the action is unrelenting when it occurs, and you believe that Katniss Everdeen can conquer the world. The source material is strong and I think that this is a good representation of it. I can’t wait to see what will happen with the next two movies. I highly recommend this movie.

DIRECTOR: Gary Ross

SCREENWRITER: Gary Ross, Suzanne Collins, Billy Ray 

CAST: Jennifer Lawrence, Josh Hutcherson, Liam Hemsworth, Elizabeth Banks, Woody Harrelson, Donald Sutherland, Lenny Kravitz, Stanley Tucci, 

RELEASE DATE: OUT NOW

MPAA RATING: PG-13

A Briefly Brief Review of Salmon Fishing In the Yemen
For those not familiar with the Arabian Peninsula, Saudi Arabia, or its surrounding parts, Salmon Fishing in the Yemen does not sound like an odd title for a movie. However, this area of the middle east is incredibly dry, hot, and has a very limited supply of drinkable (potable) water. Plants barely thrive in this environment, let alone seafood. There is an element of whimsy and wonderment in the title alone. Salmon Fishing In the Yemen. 
Based on the 2006 best-selling book of the same title, it follows the story of a sheikh who wants to bring his favorite pastime to his native country. Sheikh Muhammed hires Harriet Chetwode-Talbot (played by Emily Blunt) to try to achieve this dream.This far fetched ambition is expediated by two elements: The sheikh’s infinite bankroll and the British Prime minister’s disire to divert the public’s attention from the violence in the middle east. To help see this dream to fruition and map the plan out scientifically, she reaches out to renowned fisheries expert Dr. Alfred Jones played by Ewan McGregor. Blunt and McGregor’s characters are experiencing some major changes in their lives: Jones is having marital and Chetwode-Talbot has started a relationship with a man that has gone overseas. This is combined with the fact that they are of course….developing feelings for one another.
This movie has a lot of heart, wit and most importantly McGregor and Blunt chemistry. By the first 10 minutes or so, you realize that this script has enough moxie (yes moxie), to have you watching intently.The  supporting cast is strong with appearances from UK actors Kristin Scott Thomas and Tom Beard. Sheikh Muhammed, played by Amr Waked, is subtly charismatic and shows shades of a young Ben Kingsley. With all of that said, however, this movie is not without its flaws. The subplot in the second act to ruin salmon fishing in the Yemen is forced and unnecessary. Also, they could have splurged on some more money for reasonable green screening effects. There are portions of the movie, that seem to be done post shooting, where it’s incredibly obvious that it was added on later on. There are scenes that don’t seem to further the story and the movie could stand to lose 15 minutes.
Salmon Fishing in the Yemen is worth checking out, even with the shoddy subplot and the bad green screen effects at some parts. It has all the sappiness that you would expect from trying to make a small miracle in the middle east occur with a beautiful mid 20 something and a charming “a little too handsome to be in the medical field” 40 something. It’s out now.
DIRECTOR: Lasse Hallström  
SCREENWRITER: Simon Beaufoy (screenplay), Paul Torday (novel) 
CAST: Amr Waked, Emily Blunt, Catherine Steadman, Kristin Scott Thomas, Ewan McGregor, Tom Beard
RELEASE DATE: OUT NOW
MPAA RATING: PG-13
Trailer:

A Briefly Brief Review of Salmon Fishing In the Yemen

For those not familiar with the Arabian Peninsula, Saudi Arabia, or its surrounding parts, Salmon Fishing in the Yemen does not sound like an odd title for a movie. However, this area of the middle east is incredibly dry, hot, and has a very limited supply of drinkable (potable) water. Plants barely thrive in this environment, let alone seafood. There is an element of whimsy and wonderment in the title alone. Salmon Fishing In the Yemen. 

Based on the 2006 best-selling book of the same title, it follows the story of a sheikh who wants to bring his favorite pastime to his native country. Sheikh Muhammed hires Harriet Chetwode-Talbot (played by Emily Blunt) to try to achieve this dream.This far fetched ambition is expediated by two elements: The sheikh’s infinite bankroll and the British Prime minister’s disire to divert the public’s attention from the violence in the middle east. To help see this dream to fruition and map the plan out scientifically, she reaches out to renowned fisheries expert Dr. Alfred Jones played by Ewan McGregor. Blunt and McGregor’s characters are experiencing some major changes in their lives: Jones is having marital and Chetwode-Talbot has started a relationship with a man that has gone overseas. This is combined with the fact that they are of course….developing feelings for one another.

This movie has a lot of heart, wit and most importantly McGregor and Blunt chemistry. By the first 10 minutes or so, you realize that this script has enough moxie (yes moxie), to have you watching intently.The  supporting cast is strong with appearances from UK actors Kristin Scott Thomas and Tom Beard. Sheikh Muhammed, played by Amr Waked, is subtly charismatic and shows shades of a young Ben Kingsley. With all of that said, however, this movie is not without its flaws. The subplot in the second act to ruin salmon fishing in the Yemen is forced and unnecessary. Also, they could have splurged on some more money for reasonable green screening effects. There are portions of the movie, that seem to be done post shooting, where it’s incredibly obvious that it was added on later on. There are scenes that don’t seem to further the story and the movie could stand to lose 15 minutes.

Salmon Fishing in the Yemen is worth checking out, even with the shoddy subplot and the bad green screen effects at some parts. It has all the sappiness that you would expect from trying to make a small miracle in the middle east occur with a beautiful mid 20 something and a charming “a little too handsome to be in the medical field” 40 something. It’s out now.

DIRECTORLasse Hallström  

SCREENWRITERSimon Beaufoy (screenplay), Paul Torday (novel) 

CASTAmr Waked, Emily Blunt, Catherine Steadman, Kristin Scott Thomas, Ewan McGregor, Tom Beard

RELEASE DATE: OUT NOW

MPAA RATING: PG-13

Trailer:







A Very Special Movie Schmovie Podcast: The Best Films of 2011


Episode 26 
2011 was an amazing year for film, both critically and commercially, and we’re walking you through the aces in the deck. These are our Top 10 films of 2011.


1. Click the Play button above. Get the MP3 of the Podcast here. (Right Click/Save As it to download it!)



2. Click the logo below to subscribe to Movie Schmovie on iTunes!

 3. If you have another Podcast App, the XML file is here. (Right Click/Save As it to download it!)
A Very Special Movie Schmovie Podcast: The Best Films of 2011
Episode 26 
2011 was an amazing year for film, both critically and commercially, and we’re walking you through the aces in the deck. These are our Top 10 films of 2011.

1. Click the Play button above. Get the MP3 of the Podcast here. (Right Click/Save As it to download it!)

2. Click the logo below to subscribe to Movie Schmovie on iTunes!

 3. If you have another Podcast App, the XML file is here. (Right Click/Save As it to download it!)





The Movie Schmovie Movie Podcast Review Of Hugo.


Episode 19 is a review of Martin Scorsese’s HUGO (Ben Kingsley, Sacha Baron Cohen, Asa Butterfield). Mighty Minute review of SUSPIRIA. DVD Quick Pick reviews of STARDUST and THIS IS ENGLAND.


1. Click the Play button above. Get the MP3 of the Podcast here


2. Click the logo below to subscribe to Movie Schmovie on Itunes!


3. If you have another Podcast App, the XML file is here. Right click it to download it!

 
The Movie Schmovie Movie Podcast Review Of Hugo.

Episode 19 is a review of Martin Scorsese’s HUGO (Ben Kingsley, Sacha Baron Cohen, Asa Butterfield). Mighty Minute review of SUSPIRIA. DVD Quick Pick reviews of STARDUST and THIS IS ENGLAND.

1. Click the Play button above. Get the MP3 of the Podcast here
2. Click the logo below to subscribe to Movie Schmovie on Itunes!

3. If you have another Podcast App, the XML file is here. Right click it to download it!

 





A Special Halloween Edition of The Movie Schmovie Podcast: Top Horror Films
Episode 017 is a little off the beaten path for the Movie Schmovie podcast. Steve, Ronald and a very special guest discuss their collective, and individual, tops in the Horror genre. Will your favorites be mentioned? Listen to find out. Oh, and Happy Halloween!
1. Click the Play button above. Get the MP3 of the Podcast here
2. Click the logo below to subscribe to Movie Schmovie on Itunes!
3. If you have another Podcast App, the XML file is here. Right click it to download it! 

A Special Halloween Edition of The Movie Schmovie Podcast: Top Horror Films

Episode 017 is a little off the beaten path for the Movie Schmovie podcast. Steve, Ronald and a very special guest discuss their collective, and individual, tops in the Horror genre. Will your favorites be mentioned? Listen to find out. Oh, and Happy Halloween!

1. Click the Play button above. Get the MP3 of the Podcast here

2. Click the logo below to subscribe to Movie Schmovie on Itunes!

3. If you have another Podcast App, the XML file is here. Right click it to download it!
 





The Movie Schmovie Movie Podcast Review Of Paranormal Activity III.
Episode 016 is a review of Henry Joost and Ariel Schulman’s PARANORMAL ACTIVITY 3 (Lauren Bittner and Christopher Nicholas Smith). DVD Quick Pick review of POLTERGEIST and REC 2.).
 1. Click the Play button above. Get the MP3 of the Podcast here
 2. Click the logo below to subscribe to Movie Schmovie on Itunes
 3. If you have another Podcast App, the XML file is here. Right click it to download it!
 
 
 

The Movie Schmovie Movie Podcast Review Of Paranormal Activity III.

Episode 016 is a review of Henry Joost and Ariel Schulman’s PARANORMAL ACTIVITY 3 (Lauren Bittner and Christopher Nicholas Smith). DVD Quick Pick review of POLTERGEIST and REC 2.).

 1. Click the Play button above. Get the MP3 of the Podcast here

 2. Click the logo below to subscribe to Movie Schmovie on Itunes

 3. If you have another Podcast App, the XML file is here. Right click it to download it!

 

 





The Movie Schmovie Movie Podcast Review Of 50/50.
Episode 014 is a review of Jonathan Levine’s 50/50 (Joseph Gordon-Levitt, Seth Rogen and Anna Kendrick). Mighty Minute review of X-MEN: FIRST CLASS. DVD Quick Pick reviews of THE WACKNESS and A RIVER RUNS THROUGH IT. You can enjoy this Podcast in any of the following ways:
 1. Click the Play button above. Get the MP3 of the Podcast here
 2. Click the logo below to subscribe to Movie Schmovie on Itunes!
 3. If you have another Podcast App, the XML file is here. Right click it to download it!

The Movie Schmovie Movie Podcast Review Of 50/50.

Episode 014 is a review of Jonathan Levine’s 50/50 (Joseph Gordon-Levitt, Seth Rogen and Anna Kendrick). Mighty Minute review of X-MEN: FIRST CLASS. DVD Quick Pick reviews of THE WACKNESS and A RIVER RUNS THROUGH IT. You can enjoy this Podcast in any of the following ways:

 1. Click the Play button above. Get the MP3 of the Podcast here

 2. Click the logo below to subscribe to Movie Schmovie on Itunes!

 3. If you have another Podcast App, the XML file is here. Right click it to download it!





The Movie Schmovie Movie Podcast Review Of MONEYBALL
Episode 013 is a review of Bennett Miller’s MONEYBALL (Brad Pitt, Jonah Hill, Philip Seymour Hoffman). Mighty Minute review of WARRIOR. DVD Quick Pick reviews of CYRUS and MISSION: IMPOSSIBLE III. You can enjoy this Podcast in any of the following ways:
1. Click the Play button above. Get the MP3 of the Podcast here
2. Click the logo below to subscribe to Movie Schmovie on Itunes!
3. If you have another Podcast App, the XML file is here. Right click it to download it!

The Movie Schmovie Movie Podcast Review Of MONEYBALL

Episode 013 is a review of Bennett Miller’s MONEYBALL (Brad Pitt, Jonah Hill, Philip Seymour Hoffman). Mighty Minute review of WARRIOR. DVD Quick Pick reviews of CYRUS and MISSION: IMPOSSIBLE IIIYou can enjoy this Podcast in any of the following ways:

1. Click the Play button above. Get the MP3 of the Podcast here

2. Click the logo below to subscribe to Movie Schmovie on Itunes!

3. If you have another Podcast App, the XML file is here. Right click it to download it!





The Movie Schmovie Movie Podcast Review Of Drive
Episode 012 is a review of Nicolas Winding Refn’s DRIVE (Ryan Gosling, Carey Mulligan). Mighty Minute review of HESHER. DVD Quick Pick reviews of HALF NELSON and MURDER BY NUMBERS. You can enjoy this Podcast in any of the following ways:
1. Click the Play button above. Get the MP3 of the Podcast here
2. Click the logo below to subscribe to Movie Schmovie on Itunes!
3. If you have another Podcast App, the XML file is here. Right click it to download it!

Bonus: The mentioned song in the podcast on the Drive soundtrack is A Real Hero by College feat Electric Youth. Check it out below:


The Movie Schmovie Movie Podcast Review Of Drive

Episode 012 is a review of Nicolas Winding Refn’s DRIVE (Ryan Gosling, Carey Mulligan). Mighty Minute review of HESHER. DVD Quick Pick reviews of HALF NELSON and MURDER BY NUMBERS. You can enjoy this Podcast in any of the following ways:

1. Click the Play button above. Get the MP3 of the Podcast here

2. Click the logo below to subscribe to Movie Schmovie on Itunes!

3. If you have another Podcast App, the XML file is here. Right click it to download it!

Bonus: The mentioned song in the podcast on the Drive soundtrack is A Real Hero by College feat Electric Youth. Check it out below: